Jin Shan’s “My dad is Li Gang! 我爸是李刚!” featured in DRA

Posted by Ian on Jan 11, 2013 in arts, news, press, reviews

Jordan Mainser 2013 Art + Twitter = Chinese Democracy, DRA. Read it here.

Video of contribution to ‘The Future of Museums and the Public Humanities’ Panel Discussion

Posted by Ian on Nov 25, 2012 in news, video

October 24, 1st floor Library, Brown Center for Public Humanities, 357 Benefit Street, Providence, R.I., (use rear entrance off Williams Street) 5:30-7PM Round Table Discussion: “The Future of Museums and the Public Humanities: Perspectives from Italy,” with Paolo Rosa, Fitt Artist-in-Residence, Brown Creative Arts Council; Luigi Di Corato, General Director of the Siena Museums Foundation; […]

Panel Discussant for ‘The Future of Museums and the Public Humanities’

Posted by Ian on Oct 24, 2012 in news

October 24, 1st floor Library, Brown Center for Public Humanities, 357 Benefit Street, Providence, R.I., (use rear entrance off Williams Street) 5:30-7PM Round Table Discussion: “The Future of Museums and the Public Humanities: Perspectives from Italy,” with Paolo Rosa, Fitt Artist-in-Residence, Brown Creative Arts Council; Luigi Di Corato, General Director of the Siena Museums Foundation; […]

Workshop: The Humanities and Technology Camp New England

Posted by Ian on Oct 19, 2012 in news

Title: Building an academic and professional persona online Presenters: Steven Lubar and Ian Alden Russell Brown University, The Humanities and Technology Camp - October 19, 2012 Description: It’s important for new and emerging professionals to create and manage their web personas, their personal brands. It’s a way to meet people and keep up with ongoing discussions in […]

HEYHEYHEY’s portable postcard machine brings you patiently crafted nostalgia whenever, wherever

Posted by Ian on May 2, 2012 in blog

A wonderfully fine example of a portable nostalgia machine. Dutch design masters HEYHEYHEY have done it again, inventing amazing things to help us encounter and enjoy the world around us. Check out this and other of their wonderfully inspiring projects here: http://www.heyheyhey.nl/ —— Early 2012, HEYHEYHEY had some time to spare and they felt the need […]

Japan’s tradition of automata

Posted by Ian on Mar 12, 2012 in blog

Any words I might offer would only diminish how amazing this tradition is… From Matthew Allard: Japan has always been on the forefront of cutting edge robotics. Its roots can be traced back 200-300 years during the Edo period when skilled craftsmen created automata (self-operating machines). Using nothing more than pulleys and weights they were […]

Upside Down, Left to Right

Posted by Ian on Feb 6, 2012 in blog

A short (but inspirational) film about letterpress and one of the few remaining movable-type printing workshops in the UK, situated at Plymouth University, featuring Paul Collier.

Nostalgia Machines

Posted by Ian on Nov 19, 2011 in blog, news

The David Winton Bell Gallery will present Nostalgia Machines from Saturday, Nov. 19, 2011 through Sunday, Feb. 19, 2012. Exploring the intersection of nostalgia and technology in contemporary sculpture, the exhibition, curated by Maya Allison, features artists Meridith Pingree, Jasper Rigole, Jonathan Schipper, Gregory Witt, and Zimoun. An opening-night colloquium will be held on Friday, Nov. 18, 2011, at […]

Utopias: A conversation @ Bell Gallery

Posted by Ian on Oct 28, 2011 in news

5:30pm this evening, 28 October 2011. A panel conversation responding to the Bell Gallery’s current exhibition “Building Expectation: Past and Present Visions of the Architectural Future”. An interdisciplinary conversation between local architects and members of Brown’s faculty moderated by the exhibition curator, Nathaniel Robert Walker, the panel will be a unique opportunity to explore some […]

“Can you see me now?”: Archaeological sensibility breaking the “fourth wall” of the analog:digital divide

Posted by Ian on Mar 20, 2011 in academic, articles, arts, publications

2009 in V. O. Jorge & J. Thomas (eds.) Archaeology and the politics of vision in a post-modern context. Cambridge Scholars Publishing, Newcastle upon Tyne, pp. 118-46. Read it here. Read the intervention debrief here.